Applying To College

College Essay Writing and Interview Skills


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College Admissions Essays: Finding Your Authentic Voice

If you walked up to your friends and said  “What’s shakin, bacon?” instead of “Hi” would they laugh? Would they wonder what alien abducted their friend, or whose voice you borrowed?

There are lots of ways to say hello: “Hi, How are you, How ‘ya doin’, Yo, Peace, Hey, What’s up…” the list is almost endless. How do you say “Hello”? Whatever way you say it, it’s your own, because you’re speaking in your own voice. And that’s important to remember when writing your college admissions essay. Write in your own voice. Your authentic voice.

How do you know if you’re writing in your authentic voice?

Here are four tips:

1. Read your essay out loud: If it reads easily , you probably have a good handle on your voice. Take note of places you stumble and work on those.

2. Is your writing style too formal? If your essay has a lot of formal language like “thus” and “however” take another look and make sure it’s necessary. If not, choose less formal words. If some of your sentences feel stiff when you read them out loud, try changing the sentence structure around and then read it again.

3. Is your writing style too casual? It is possible to be too casual. Remember, you’re writing your college admissions essay for an adult to read. This isn’t a text message to your bff.

4. If you’re having trouble finding your authentic voice: Try writing a mock letter to a friend who doesn’t know you very well. It can be about anything: school, your friends, what you do for fun, what the dog did yesterday.  Be the narrator and explain what that part of your life is like. As you write, you’ll find you start using more of your authentic voice.

Your college admissions essay needs to reflect you, and who you are. One important way to do that is to write in your own voice.

I’m outta here.


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“Seven Secrets of College Admissions”

An interesting and quick read from Forbes.com gives seven pointers on choosing the best college and raises interesting questions. Is college choice about prestige? Should it be about a journey of self-discovery? Do we do a disservice to both the school and the student by labeling it a “safety school”?

A few of the article’s answers may seem obvious. (“When touring colleges visit differences. Compare an urban campus…to a quieter campus.”) But another does not: “Scan the rankings of best colleges and ignore them.” Should we do that?

Eventually everyone’s going to have a college list. Some of these lists have been prepared years ahead of time, groomed to be Ivy League or other prestigious schools. Once you’ve got the list it’s good to step back and take an objective look. What’s not on the list?

College choice needs to be a good match with the student’s interests, both academic and non-academic. I worked with a student from Stamford who excelled in math and science, and won a science scholarship. But he also liked music and art, and knew himself well enough that he didn’t want to limit his choices. So while he applied to a couple of prestigious science-heavy schools, he also applied to schools that were well-rounded in the arts. He chose one of those schools and it turned out to be a great fit. Last year he took a heavy load of science. And he also took banjo lessons.

Look for the best fit possible, not necessarily the best name possible. Sometimes that may mean a bit of a different choice.

Read the entire article at: www.forbes.com/2010/08/24/college-admissions-secrets-best-colleges-10-lifestyle-marcus.html