Applying To College

College Essay Writing and Interview Skills


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A Cornell Dean’s Advice For Parents Of New College Students – Forbes

Are you a parent of a new college student?

Forbes has published excellent advice to help the entire family adjust. The advice is from David DeVries, associate dean for undergraduate education in Cornell’s College of Arts and Sciences.

Some of the highlights include allowing the students to “figure it out for themselves,” advice on managing studying and sticky roommate situations, and more serious matters such as homesickness, insecurity, anger and disappointment.

Here’s the article:
Some Advice For Parents Of New College Students – Forbes.

sharon-epstein-college-essay-writing-and-interview-skillsSharon Epstein is owner of First Impressions College Consulting in Redding, Connecticut. A Writers Guild Award-winner and two-time Emmy Award nominee, Sharon teaches students how to master interview skills, write killer resumes, and transform their goals, dreams and experiences into memorable college application essays. She works with students everywhere: in-person, by phone, Skype and email. Visit her website for more info. Connect on Google+, Pinterest and Twitter.


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“Seven Secrets of College Admissions”

An interesting and quick read from Forbes.com gives seven pointers on choosing the best college and raises interesting questions. Is college choice about prestige? Should it be about a journey of self-discovery? Do we do a disservice to both the school and the student by labeling it a “safety school”?

A few of the article’s answers may seem obvious. (“When touring colleges visit differences. Compare an urban campus…to a quieter campus.”) But another does not: “Scan the rankings of best colleges and ignore them.” Should we do that?

Eventually everyone’s going to have a college list. Some of these lists have been prepared years ahead of time, groomed to be Ivy League or other prestigious schools. Once you’ve got the list it’s good to step back and take an objective look. What’s not on the list?

College choice needs to be a good match with the student’s interests, both academic and non-academic. I worked with a student from Stamford who excelled in math and science, and won a science scholarship. But he also liked music and art, and knew himself well enough that he didn’t want to limit his choices. So while he applied to a couple of prestigious science-heavy schools, he also applied to schools that were well-rounded in the arts. He chose one of those schools and it turned out to be a great fit. Last year he took a heavy load of science. And he also took banjo lessons.

Look for the best fit possible, not necessarily the best name possible. Sometimes that may mean a bit of a different choice.

Read the entire article at: www.forbes.com/2010/08/24/college-admissions-secrets-best-colleges-10-lifestyle-marcus.html