Applying To College

College Essay Writing and Interview Skills


4 Comments

College Interview Tips: Combating Nerves

How to stop interview nervesLet’s face it. For some people, just hearing the words “college interview” can be scary.  It can feel like you’re starring in one of those cop shows where the subject’s being interrogated, sweating bullets while he tries to come up with the right answers.

Not your college interview.  So don’t worry.

Okay, you say — you get that. You know the interviewer’s not your enemy. You’ve prepared for your college interview. But you still feel your mouth going dry. What do you do?

There are some easy-to-learn techniques that can help.

Here are 6 Tips to Combat Interview Nerves:

1. Arrive early. It will give you time to sit down, relax, take a look around, and get your bearings.

2. Take a short, brisk walk before your interview. Walk off the jitters. You’ll get rid of nervous energy and be less fidgety once you get inside.

3. Bring a bottle of water. Nerves can cause a dry mouth, so have water with you and take a sip when you need it.

4. Take a deep breath. Focusing on your breath can be very calming. Try this exercise: Breathe in on a slow count of four, hold it for four, and breathe out on a count of four.

5. Greet the interviewer with a smile and a handshake. Look him or her in the eye, smile, offer your hand, and say hello. You’re taking the initiative to start the interview on confident, friendly terms, and you’ll find it makes a difference.

6. Try “small talk” first. You don’t have to get down to big questions right away. You can ease into the interview with a bit of small talk — what you’ve seen of the campus, how the directions were easy to follow, even how the weather is. This will give you an extra few moments to ease into things.

Every interviewer understands about nerves. The trick is to be well prepared for your interview, and then to use the techniques that can help make you shine.
sharon-epstein-college-essay-writing-and-interview-skills
Sharon Epstein is a Writers Guild Award-winner and two-time Emmy Award nominee, teaching students around the world how to master interview skills, write resumes, and transform their goals, dreams and experiences into memorable college application essays. She works with students everywhere: in-person, by phone, FaceTime, Skype and email. Visit my website for more info. Connect on Google+, Pinterest and Twitter.

 


3 Comments

College Interview Tips: How to Interview with an Alum

I used to be an alumni interviewer for Cornell University. I enjoyed meeting the students, and I hope they got a good impression of the school from me.

Alumni interviews aren’t going to make or break your college acceptance, but they will add another dimension to your college application and give you a direct connection to the school you might not otherwise have had.

Here are 6 Tips for Interviewing with an Alum:

1. Dress nicely. Don’t wear anything too short, low-cut, or cut off. Pull out the khakis, collared shirts, dress slacks, skirts and dresses instead.

2. Arrive on time. Offer a firm handshake and greet the interviewer by name. When you leave make sure to say thank you.

3. Be prepared to discuss why you want to go to that school. The more specific you can be, the better, so do your homework.  If you’re vamping, the interviewer will know it.

4. Be ready with questions. Asking questions shows curiosity and interest, so don’t be shy about asking for information. Prepare two or three questions in advance that you can ask at your interview. Alumni are very interested in sharing their experience and knowledge, and will go out of their way to get your questions answered, even if they don’t know the answers themselves. I’ve set up phone calls with sports coaches and found names of specific instructors for students who have asked.

5. Target some of your questions based on when the interviewer graduated. If the interviewer graduated recently you can ask about specific teachers he or she would recommend or the dorms to stay in. If the interviewer is older you might ask how alumni remain active after graduation, or how his or her degree helped prepare for a career.

6. Follow up immediately with a thank you note. Email is, and handwritten note is always a nice addition. Don’t be too casual when you write. Say “Dear ____.” Mention something the two of you talked about, and say that you enjoyed the experience — that will leave the interviewer with a good impression.

I’ve been greeted at my door by students wearing cut-offs and flip-flops. I’ve been told by students that they don’t have any questions for me. When you’re an alum you know when students are interested in your school and when they’re not. Be interested.

sharon-epstein-college-essay-writing-and-interview-skills
Sharon Epstein is owner of First Impressions College Consulting in Redding, Connecticut. A Writers Guild Award-winner and two-time Emmy Award nominee, Sharon teaches students around the world how to master interview skills, write resumes, and transform their goals, dreams and experiences into memorable college application essays. She works with students everywhere: in-person, by phone, FaceTime, Skype and email. Visit my website for more info. Connect on Google+, Pinterest and Twitter.


3 Comments

College Interview Tips: Is It Okay to Ask for Something to Drink?

A couple of days ago I watched a video on “College Interview Tips.” Number one was to bring questions for the interviewer. Number two was to turn off your cell phone.  Number three was to refuse the offer of something to drink. What??

I watched the woman in the video holding an empty paper cup. “Where are you going to put this?” she asked. “On the interviewer’s desk?” She frowned. “Are you going to hold it the whole time?” She shook her head. “What if you get nervous or move the wrong way?” She tipped the cup over. “Don’t accept anything to drink.” OMG. What if you’re thirsty???

It’s okay to accept a drink if you need one. College interviews cause nerves, and nerves can cause dry mouth. Always bring a bottle of water with you to the interview. If you get a dry mouth you’re covered. Plus, if you get stuck on a question a sip can give you a little extra time to think.

Obviously, think twice if there’s no place to put the cup and you’ll have to hold it. If the interviewer’s desk is the only available space, ask if it’s okay to put the cup there. Interviewers aren’t ogres and they’re not going to record that you were gauche enough to ask to park your cup — which they have been kind enough to give you — on the only available surface in the room. Certainly don’t put it at your feet; you’ll forget it’s there and that’s trouble. Now, if you know you’re clumsy, accepting that drink may not be such a good idea. But it’s not a cut and dry “never.”

Take a bottle of water to your college interview. But if you need something to drink, accept the offer.